11
Jul
17

Police investigating footage of ‘gamekeepers’ shooting & snaring wildlife in Peak District National Park

The Mirror has just published an article entitled “Barbaric”: Wild animals trapped and shot in UK National Park to protect birds for shooting season and a by-line stating “Film taken in Peak District National Park shows gamekeepers shooting and trapping wild animals in a bid to stop them killing grouse as bird hunting season nears” (see here).

The article includes video footage and a number of photographs taken by a group called the Hunt Investigation Team. The video shows a masked man shooting off a snare around a badger’s neck (and the badger subsequently running off) and another masked man shooting dead a snared fox.

The video is graphic and makes for unpleasant viewing, but from what we can see, none of the filmed activity shows obvious illegal activity. Interesting, though, that the armed men are masked. That’d be quite a shock for any member of the public who happened to be walking in this National Park.

It is legal to snare foxes (as long as certain snaring conditions are met, and these conditions vary between England & Scotland) and then to shoot the snared fox. The snared fox in the video, which is obviously distressed, is dispatched quickly.

It is illegal to deliberately snare badgers, however, as snares are indiscriminate, badgers and other non-target species can often be caught by accident. When this happens, the badger must either be immediately released when found by the snare operator, or, if it is badly injured, it can be humanely killed. The masked man in the video uses his firearm to shoot through the snare and the badger is able to run free. The masked man makes no attempt to kill the badger, even though he had ample opportunity.

There are obvious welfare concerns about the badger being released with wire still around its neck, and by law, snares should not be set in areas where badgers are known to inhabit. The snare operator should be skilled at detecting badger signs and where seen, snares should not be set. Perhaps this is what the police are investigating? *see update at foot of blog

It’s also possible that there is further video evidence that has not been released to the media. One ominous photograph, that looks like it’s a screen grab from a video, shows a masked man approaching an apparently snared badger with a half-raised shovel. It’s impossible to judge from this photograph whether the masked man is about to use the shovel to protect himself as he frees the badger, or whether he is about to use the shovel to cave in the badger’s skull. Perhaps the full video sequence is more enlightening.

The Mirror article claims the two masked men are gamekeepers, working to protect grouse stocks. The ground that can be seen in the video doesn’t look like a grouse moor but of course this footage could have been filmed on land adjacent to a grouse moor. The name of the location has not been published. It’s highly likely that the two masked, armed men are gamekeepers, and perhaps the Hunt Investigation Team has further intelligence to support this. If they’re not gamekeepers, then the police will be investigating whether these two armed, masked men had landowner permission to be snaring and shooting wildlife here.

So although there may be more to this story than has been presented by the Mirror article, based on what’s been published this appears to show gamekeepers undertaking lawful gamekeeping activity. Nevertheless, it will be abhorrent to many, and probably an eye-opener to the average Mirror reader who perhaps is unaware that snaring is even legal in 21st Century Britain, and probably also unaware of the routine killing of wildlife that is allowed in this country all so a minority sector of society can shoot gamebirds for fun. That this is permitted within a National Park will also probably be shocking news to many. Good, this is exactly the sort of information that needs to be widely publicised.

UPDATE: Thanks to one of our Twitter followers for providing the following link to the Hunt Investigation Team website, which names the estate as the Moscar Estate (a known grouse-shooting estate within the Peak District National Park) and provides much more detail and further gruesome video evidence and commentary on what was filmed there earlier this spring. See HERE.

Advertisements

28 Responses to “Police investigating footage of ‘gamekeepers’ shooting & snaring wildlife in Peak District National Park”


  1. 1 Secret Squirrel
    July 11, 2017 at 2:33 am

    “During the four weeks, two badgers, one mountain hare, one fox and three lambs were found caught”. Presumably either written off by farmers as killed by foxes or far-roaming Sea Eagles and Ravens, or accepted by them as a consequence of ‘pest control’

  2. 2 chris lock
    July 11, 2017 at 5:53 am

    Another fiasco which the law would turn a blind eye to as most of the law makers shoot grouse.

  3. 3 Paul V Irving
    July 11, 2017 at 7:31 am

    I thought at least one snare shown was a locking snare and thus illegal. outwith the associated barbarity. Masked and armed ought to be a public order offence.

  4. 4 keen birder
    July 11, 2017 at 8:27 am

    What a pratt, why be wearing a mask, maybe the midges were bad. The shot from his shotgun would possibly burst the ear drums of the badger. He ought to have had a forked stick to pin down any non target species and also carried wire cuttters, then could have easily cut through the wire snare, in stead of allowing the badger to run off with a snare still around its neck. And the fox, why did he shoot from such a long distance, causing the fox to be wounded, if he had slowly walked up to it ,the fox would have tried to remain invisible by freezing, then he could have had a more humane shot .

  5. July 11, 2017 at 8:46 am

    It’s hard not to conclude that going masked and concealing your identity in these circumstances is tantamount to an admission of ill-intent. I for one am quite surprised that going armed and concealing your identity in this manner doesn’t seem to be a specific offence. However, it seems to me that those who do conceal their identity in these circumstances may be in breach of several sections of the 1968 Firearms Act which requires that a holder of a shotgun licence is “fit to be entrusted” with a shotgun or where there is “evidence of disturbing and unusual behaviour of a kind which gives rise to well-founded fears about the future misuse of firearms”. To my mind walking around armed and masked certainly, falls into the latter category.

  6. July 11, 2017 at 8:53 am

    a gamekeeper at work. loath these excuses for men and would love to see this man [Ed: rest of comment deleted as libellous]

  7. 7 Merlin
    July 11, 2017 at 10:04 am

    Massive thanks to the Hunt investigation team for the work they have put in to obtain this footage and to the daily mirror for publishing this. In neighbouring North Yorkshire a Police chief constable applied and received a grant to take primary school children up onto the Grouse moors to see the work of the gamekeepers, in light of this would anyone want to send their children out with these people

  8. 9 Jeff P
    July 11, 2017 at 10:39 am

    The masked keeper in the main photo also appears to be wearing protective nitrile gloves.
    I’m sure there’s a perfectly reasonable explanation. Perhaps he doesn’t want to get his hands dirty?
    Hmmm….

  9. 10 Pete Moss
    July 11, 2017 at 11:05 am

    In the video on the HIT website, 1:38 mins in, looks like a jay as decoy in a larsen trap. The Gov.uk website is confusing about whether Jays can be used as decoys in England (they can’t in Scotland). The webpage says they can’t, the licence document on the website says they can! [comparing this https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/wild-birds-licence-to-take-or-kill-for-conservation-purposes and this https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578766/gl06-birds-conservation-licence.PDF%5D If anyone know what the position is it would be worth alerting HIT of that.

    • 11 Paul V Irving
      July 11, 2017 at 2:40 pm

      They cannot be used it is an offence I hope it has been reported.

      • 12 Pete Moss
        July 11, 2017 at 9:34 pm

        Hi Paul that is not what the licence documents say (the 2nd link) but it is what the webpage says, first link. Other sites i have seen suggest Jays can be used. And Natural resources wales website says then can be used in Wales also. They definitely can’t in Scotland. I sent a tweet to Natural England asking them.

  10. 13 AnMac
    July 11, 2017 at 11:07 am

    At last we have evidence of what it is like to have a ‘day in the office’ for gamekeepers. How do they manage to sleep at night when they have spent their hours in the office killing defenceless animals in and around our National Parks.

  11. 15 Les Wallace
    July 11, 2017 at 2:30 pm

    The link to the HIT info on the background to this was brilliant – summed up how insane driven grouse shooting is as well as how cruel and the ‘conservation’ argument for it being a total lie. It’s not even a Victorian hangover it’s bloody medieval. The RSPB’s report on what’s been going on in the Peak District is jaw dropping https://www.rspb.org.uk/Images/PeakMalpractice_tcm9-132666.pdf. Badgers as well as raptors were noted as being persecuted. Well done HIT and Daily Mirror.

  12. 16 Tony Warburton MBE
    July 11, 2017 at 7:33 pm

    Question. Have the police interviewed the Duke of Rutland, the Manager of the Moscar Estate and the Head Gamekeeper for their comments? Did I just see a pig fly across the moon just then?

  13. 17 lizzybusy
    July 11, 2017 at 8:38 pm

    First of all, I wish to apologise for the length of this reply!

    Having examined the Hunt Investigation Team’s web site I think there are lots of potential crimes.

    For starters – the snared lambs almost certainly will have been the property of a farmer. Their injuries constitute criminal damage if they did not belong to the game keeper and theft if the lambs were not returned to their owners. Even if the lambs belonged to the game keeper, he did not exercise best practice measures to protect his livestock from pain, injury, suffering or disease by keeping them secure in a field or holding area away from these vicious, indiscriminate devices. The same offences will apply to the snared pet mentioned in the website but not shown.

    The snares that caught the badgers breached the latest industry code of practice which requires breakaway links precisely so that larger snared animals like badgers can break free from the snares. Whilst that, in itself, is not an offence, once aanumal has been caught in a snare, the person responsible for the animal has to use best practice guidelines to minimise pain, injury, disease and suffering. The guidelines can give an indication of the snare user’s adherence to best practice guidelines. Clearly that did not happen here. The game keeper, in one of the videos, shot at the wire. Again, in doing this, he breached industry best practice guidelines. The GWCT’s website gives guidance on what tools to use to securely hold a badger in position while a snare is cut to release it (if it is uninjured.). I don’t know if the game keeper who shot at the wire of the first snare the Badgers was caught in was checked for any injuries but by firing the gun so close to the animal and not cutting the snare from around the animal’s neck, he was highly likely to have caused suffering and injuries. When the poor creature got caught in a second snare and was subjected repeatedly to gun fire very close to it, the game keeper, clearly subjected the animal to suffering and almost certain injury. That snare may have been a self locking snare. By shooting the end off, the snares will have become self locking. It will be impossible for the badger to remove or loosen the wire which will have become frayed – yet another industry code breach!

    You pointed out, setting snares where there are badger runs is illegal, as is causing injury to a badger. Badger runs are easy to spot. Every game keeper will know how to identify them. If they don’t they’ve breached another industry code!

    One of the snares looks like it has been set next to a sharp dip where there is the risk of strangulation and, according to the web site, next to branches (ie barriers on either side of the track, guiding the animals to the snares.). In this way the snares have been positioned to cause injury – this is illegal and another industry code breach.

    Snares are supposed to be checked every 24 hours, and, according to industry guidelines, they should be checked twice a day. It’d be interesting to see what the videos reveal.

    Below, I’ve pasted links to the various crimes. Below that, I’ve pasted some of the industry guidelines from 2016.

    I think the police, potentially have plenty to go on. Whether they actually do something is another matter …

    Offence 1
    Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, S11 Prohibition of certain methods of killing or taking wild animals.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/section/11

    S11(1) “Subject to the provisions of this Part, if any person—

    (a) sets in position any self-locking snare which is of such a nature and so placed as to be calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal coming into contact therewith;
    (b) uses for the purpose of killing or taking (capturing) any wild animal any self-locking snare, whether or not of such a nature or so placed as aforesaid

    he shall be guilty of an offence.”

    Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, S18 Attempts to commit offences etc.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/section/18

    S18(1) “Any person who attempts to commit an offence under the foregoing provisions of this Part shall be guilty of an offence and shall be punishable in like manner as for the said offence.”
    ___________________________________

    Offence 2
    Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, S11 Prohibition of certain methods of killing or taking wild animals.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/section/11

    S11(2) “Subject to the provisions of this Part, if any person—

    (a) sets in position any of the following articles, being an article which is of such a nature and so placed as to be calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal included in Schedule 6 which comes into contact therewith, that is to say, any … snare”
    (b) uses for the purpose of killing or taking (ie capturing) any such wild animal any such article as aforesaid, whether or not of such a nature and so placed as aforesaid …;
    (f) knowingly causes or permits to be done an act which is mentioned in the foregoing provisions of this subsection,

    he shall be guilty of an offence.”

    Schedule 6
    Animals which may not be Killed or Taken (ie Captured) by Certain Methods
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/schedule/6

    Badger (Meles meles)
    Cat, Wild (Felis silvestris)
    Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus)
    Marten, Pine (Martes martes)
    Otter, Common (Lutra lutra)
    Polecat (Mustela putorius)
    Squirrel, Red (Sciurus vulgaris)

    Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, S18 Attempts to commit offences etc.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/section/18

    S18(1) “Any person who attempts to commit an offence under the foregoing provisions of this Part shall be guilty of an offence and shall be punishable in like manner as for the said offence.”
    ___________________________________

    Offence 3
    Animal Welfare Act 2006, S4 Unnecessary Suffering
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/45/section/4

    S4(1) “A person commits an offence if—

    (a) an act of his, or a failure of his to act, causes an animal to suffer,
    (b) he knew, or ought reasonably to have known, that the act, or failure to act, would have that effect or be likely to do so,
    (c) the animal is a protected (ie captured) animal, and
    (d) the suffering is unnecessary.

    (2) A person commits an offence if

    (a) he is responsible for an animal,
    (b) an act, or failure to act, of another person causes the animal to suffer,
    (c) he permitted that to happen or failed to take such steps (whether by way of supervising the other person or otherwise) as were reasonable in all the circumstances to prevent that happening, and
    (d) the suffering is unnecessary.

    (3) The considerations to which it is relevant to have regard when determining for the purposes of this section whether suffering is unnecessary include—

    (a) whether the suffering could reasonably have been avoided or reduced;
    (b) whether the conduct which caused the suffering was in compliance with any relevant enactment or any relevant provisions of a licence or code of practice issued under an enactment; …
    (e) whether the conduct concerned was in all the circumstances that of a reasonably competent and humane person.”
    ___________________________________

    Offence 4
    Animal Welfare Act 2006, S9 Duty of person responsible for animal to ensure welfare
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/45/section/9

    S9(1) “A person commits an offence if he does not take such steps as are reasonable in all the circumstances to ensure that the needs of an animal for which he is responsible are met to the extent required by good practice.

    (2) For the purposes of this Act, an animal’s needs shall be taken to include

    (e) its need to be protected from pain, suffering, injury and disease.”
    ___________________________________

    Offence 5
    Protection of Animals Act 1911, S1 Offences of cruelty.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Geo5/1-2/27/section/1

    S1(1) “If any person—

    (a) shall cruelly beat, kick, ill-treat, over-ride, over-drive, over-load, torture, infuriate, or terrify any animal, or shall cause or procure, or, being the owner, permit any animal to be so used, or shall, by wantonly or unreasonably doing or omitting to do any act, or causing or procuring the commission or omission of any act, cause any unnecessary suffering, or, being the owner, permit any unnecessary suffering to be so caused to any animal such person shall be guilty of an offence of cruelty within the meaning of this Act.

    (2) For the purposes of this section, an owner shall be deemed to have permitted cruelty within the meaning of this Act if he shall have failed to exercise reasonable care and supervision in respect of the protection of the animal therefrom.”
    ___________________________________

    Offence 6
    Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996, S1 Offences.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1996/3/section/1

    S1 “If, save as permitted by this Act, any person mutilates, kicks, beats, nails or otherwise impales, stabs, burns, stones, crushes, drowns, drags or asphyxiates any wild mammal with intent to inflict unnecessary suffering he shall be guilty of an offence.

    Note 1
    Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996, S2 Exceptions from offence under the Act.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1996/3/section/2

    S2 “A person shall not be guilty of an offence under this Act by reason of—

    (d) any act made unlawful by section 1 if the act was done by means of any snare, … lawfully used for the purpose of killing or taking any wild mammal;”

    Therefore, the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996, S1 does not apply to snares which have been lawfully set.
    ________________________________

    Protection of Badgers Act 1992, S1 Taking, injuring or killing badgers.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1992/51/section/1

    S1(1) “A person is guilty of an offence if, except as permitted by or under this Act, he wilfully kills, injures or takes or attempts to kill, injure or take, a badger.
    (6) A person is guilty of an offence if, except as permitted by or under this Act, he knowingly causes or permits to be done an act which is made unlawful by subsection (1)”.
    ________________________________

    Offence 7
    Protection of Badgers Act 1992, S2 Cruelty
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1992/51/section/2

    S2(1) “A person is guilty of an offence if
    (a) he cruelly ill-treats the badger.

    (3) A person is guilty of an offence if, except as permitted by or under this Act, the person knowingly causes or permits to be done an act which is made unlawful by subsection (1) above.”
    ________________________________

    Offence 8
    Criminal Damage Act, S1 Destroying or damaging property.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1971/48/section/1

    S1(1) “A person who without lawful excuse destroys or damages any property belonging to another intending to destroy or damage any such property or being reckless as to whether any such property would be destroyed or damaged shall be guilty of an offence. … shall be guilty of an offence.”

    Note 1
    Property can be pets, livestock or captured or dead game birds and game animals.
    ________________________________

    Offence 9
    Theft Act 1968, S1 Basic definition of theft.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1968/60/section/1

    S1(1) “A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and “thief” and “steal” shall be construed accordingly.

    (2) It is immaterial whether the appropriation is made with a view to gain, or is made for the thief’s own benefit.”
    ________________________________

    Offence 10
    WIldlife and Countryside Act 1981, S11(3) Uses snare to injure a wild animal and daily inspections
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69/section/11

    S11(3) “if any person—

    (a) sets in position or knowingly causes or permits to be set in position any snare which is of such a nature and so placed as to be calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal coming into contact therewith; and
    (b) while the snare remains in position fails, without reasonable excuse, to inspect it, or cause it to be inspected, at least once every day, … he shall be guilty of an offence.”
    ___________________________________

    Code of best practice on the use of snares for fox control in England, 2016
    “• To hold, not kill: snares must only be used as a restraining (holding) device. The purpose of the snare is to hold the fox and avoid causing unnecessary suffering while the fox is held, until it can be killed humanely. …
    • You must only use a free-running snare which is defined, for the purpose of this Code, as a wire loop that relaxes when the fox stops pulling.
    • Defra considers a self-locking snare to be a wire loop that does not relax when the fox stops pulling. You must never set a self-locking snare as this is illegal.
    “At each inspection the following must be done …
    5.Inspect the condition of the snare. Never use a frayed, kinked, rusty or damaged snare – snares in such condition must be disposed of safely.
    “• Always use a Code compliant snare….
    You must only use snares which have all the components listed below.
    • WIRE. …The wire must not be rusty, frayed, kinked or damaged in any way.
    • BREAK-AWAY. The snare must incorporate at the eye as its weakest point a ‘break-away’ of appropriate strength to allow the self-release of stronger non-target animals.”
    “At each inspection the following must be done …
    6.Check that your snares are set and positioned as intended.”
    “Never set snares:
    1.Under or near fences or other obstructions, like saplings, hedges, walls or gates that could cause entanglement.
    2.Where livestock could be caught.
    3 In areas regularly and legitimately used for the exercise of domestic animals, near public footpaths or housing.
    4.On or near to an active badger sett, or on the runs radiating from it.
    5.On footbridges, or on fallen trees or logs spanning watercourses.
    6 In such a way that the restrained animal could become fully or partially suspended, entangled, drowned or strangled.”
    “Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 you are responsible for taking reasonable steps to ensure that the welfare needs of all animals under your control (including those caught in a snare) are met, to the extent required by good practice. In this context, that the animal is protected from pain and suffering.
    IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF YOUR LEGAL OBLIGATIONS DO NOT SET A SNARE.”
    “Legal Requirements
    3 It is an offence for a person to cause unnecessary suffering to an animal under their control (this applies to animals while held in snares and the means by which they are killed).
    4 It is an offence to cause unnecessary suffering to a domestic animal.”
    “Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 you are responsible for taking reasonable steps to ensure that the welfare needs of all animals under your control (including those caught in a snare) are met, to the extent required by good practice. In this context, that the animal is protected from pain and suffering.
    IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF YOUR LEGAL OBLIGATIONS DO NOT SET A SNARE.”

    “By law, snares must be inspected at least once every day, however, this Code recommends that snares are inspected twice daily. As most captures are made at night it is recommended that you inspect your snares as soon after sunrise as is practicable. A further inspection should be carried out later in the day to ensure that your snares are in position for the night, and that any daytime captures are dealt with promptly.”

  14. July 12, 2017 at 7:52 am

    Thank you for contacting the Peak District National Park.

    Your comments have been passed to our Communications Department. Our Chief Executive, Sarah Fowler, has issued the following statement – “People are understandably distressed by these images, taken on a private estate. Conserving and enhancing the natural beauty and wildlife of the National Park is something we work hard to achieve with our partners. We will support the police in their investigation. We will also continue to support moorland owners in achieving good practice in managing the moors of the Peak District National Park.”

    If you require any further information or assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the Customer and Business Support Team direct on 01629 816 200 Monday – Friday from 8.45am to 5pm.

    Yours sincerely

    Nancy Detchon
    Customer and Business Support Team Adviser

    A masterly “statement” which says precisely nothing and addresses none of the points that I raised. Thank you Sarah Fowler.

  15. 20 Cryptic Cyril
    July 13, 2017 at 10:42 am

    The reason keepers wear masks (apart from when doing things they shouldn’t), is because people are trying to film them, and historically some of these films have been edited and mis-construed to assist with false claims of illegality. Or, these films are then presented on the internet in a highly biased and emotive manner, leaving the people identified in them vulnerable to harassment and violence, as has happened.

    Keen birder, you are right, badgers shouldn’t be released with a snare attached to them, regardless of the fact that with no anchor the badger will almost certainly rid itself of the non-locking snares used in the film without difficulty. But it is sub-standard and would doubtless damage the badger’s hearing badly, I agree. However, apart from that it is plain from your comments that you have never dealt with animals in snares. A fox does not behave anything like your description, and the main reason to shoot a fox from a distance is to try and do it before the fox realises you are there, which makes shooting it a lot easier if you manage it.

    The keeping community is not perfect, true. But you people really do talk some brazenly un-informed rot on here.

    • July 13, 2017 at 10:47 am

      Thanks for your comment, Cryptic Cyril.

      Please can you provide examples where “some of these films have been edited and mis-construed to assist with false claims of illegality” and where “these films are then presented on the internet in a highly biased and emotive manner, leaving the people identified in them vulnerable to harassment and violence, as has happened”.

      Thanks

    • 24 J .Coogan
      July 13, 2017 at 4:36 pm

      Ok , if you were not up to criminal activity you would not be filmed , its because you are criminals that you wear masks , that what criminals do.
      The film shows the FACTS.
      Snares should not be set where Badgers are known to be.
      The snares were clearly anchored .I have never known an animal to rid itself of a non locking snare ,it might be possible but a very rare event ( and I have snared a lot)
      How can you even begin to defend the use of a shotgun blast to release an animal from a snare ,I must have missed that technique in the snaring guidelines.
      You try to shoot the fox before it sees you , how considerate. A fox or Badger will struggle frantically to release itself and will probably not struggle any more than it already has even if it sees a man. I have on numerous occasions come across animals who have worn a huge hole struggling in these damned contraptions for weeks.
      How do you explain away the shooting of the Badger?
      Don’t dare try to tell me and the intelligent people on this site that that we don’t know what we are talking about. I was involved in this “sport” of over five years and know what I have seen ,you and your kind are simply barbaric. What you don’t like is getting caught, well you better get used to it.

      • 25 J .Coogan
        July 13, 2017 at 4:51 pm

        I must add , he probably meant that the animal would rid itself the shot way snare , that of course is possible but the animal would have burst eardrums , it was wounded would have lacerations , all of which would quickly become infected, and of course would be so traumatised that it would never leave the set. Should have read it more carefully but these bastards make me so fucking angry I can hardly see straight.

    • 26 keen birder
      July 13, 2017 at 11:17 pm

      Cryptic CyriI, ive set snares, and shot foxes trapped in them with my .22 rifle, they usually squat down, on approach, theres no point in firing at a distance like what was shown in the film, he didnt make a very good job of his first shot. I have also released a badger from a snare, and that was held in a manner that I have suggested , I ve done just about everything, Keepering, so im not as green and cabbage looking that you probably think..

  16. 27 keen birder
    July 13, 2017 at 11:26 pm

    The worst thing about snares is them not being checked, mine were looked at first thing every morning, .


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Blog Stats

  • 3,285,703 hits

Archives

Our recent blog visitors