31
Mar
17

Peregrine found shot in Hampshire

The RSPB’s investigations team is reporting the discovery of a shot peregrine in Hampshire.

The bird, which hatched on Salisbury Cathedral in 2014, was found in King Somborne, Hants, on 11 March 2017, unable to fly.

It was taken to the Hawk Conservancy Trust in Andover where an x-ray revealed it had a fractured wing with gunshot fragments lodged next to the fracture site.

The peregrine is currently undergoing rehabilitation at the Hawk Conservancy Trust.

For further details see the RSPB Investigations Team blog here, which also lists some of the other peregrines that have been found so far this year, either shot or found dead in suspicious circumstances.

Meanwhile, the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) has joined forces with the Northern Ireland Raptor Study Group to proactively protect peregrine breeding sites throughout the region. Real partnership working – good for them. More information can be found on the NIRSG website here.

UPDATE 25 May 2017: Shot peregrine successfully rehabilitated and returned to the wild by Hawk Conservancy Trust (see here).

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7 Responses to “Peregrine found shot in Hampshire”


  1. 1 Greer Hart, senior
    March 31, 2017 at 11:46 am

    Another victim in a war of attrition on our beloved Birds of Prey. It should be another nail in the coffin of those responsible. It is the sheer arrogance of those responsible who feel they can do as they please. They think they can just choose which laws to obey, and those relating to the protection of wildlife, can be ignored.

    The recent House of Commons debate on animal welfare, recently broadcast on TV, revealed that animal welfare and wildlife protection issues were the most common item in many politician’s mail from the public. Someday, I hope that mankind will learn to live in peace with other creatures. We must sustain the pressure and help produce a new generation that will despise the ill-treatment of the natural world, and bring in detection, arraigning and a eventual punishment that will deter wildlife crime and destruction of the fabric of the countryside.

  2. 3 Secret Squirrel
    March 31, 2017 at 1:27 pm

    Peregrines have it bad because they are targeted not just by gamekeepers, but also by pidgeon enthusiasts (Good chance the one in Lytham was one of those).

  3. 4 chris lock
    March 31, 2017 at 2:42 pm

    A number of estates round the Somborne area, can the law be bothered, or have they more important matters to attend to?

  4. 5 J .Coogan
    March 31, 2017 at 2:59 pm

    Your first comment Secret Squirrel addresses the heart of the matter , until as a race we find it abhorrent to kill any animal then cruelty will continue and no amount of policing will help . The acceptance ,even by some conservation minded people that we need to kill stoats, weasels, crows, foxes etc etc by their hundreds of thousands because they are “vermin ” and that nature is the better for it ,is mind numbing. We are not even close to understanding the complexities of nature , what George Monbiot calls the “trophic cascades” and the flunkies in their tweed shorts who do the killing understand it least of all.

  5. 6 keen birder
    March 31, 2017 at 5:36 pm

    Im getting a bit tired of the human race, : another large wet 100 acre upland near me is currently being drained, goodbye to another habitat.
    : Was told the other weekend that recently 400 Jackdaws had been shot in four nights roost shooting, in Cumbria What is the point in that ?
    See on the news this morning that Elephants are still being killed in very large numbers for ivory.
    It will be too late for many habitats unless more is done to save them. Been in the Lake District today, most of fells of badly in need of more native woodland. Just remnants now of what was obviously woodland, ancient Hawthorns growing on hillsides, just hanging on , with no chance of natural regeneration, as its grazed, acres of bracken and rush, very sad really. Thousands of acres with no trees, thats not natural .


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