30
Aug
16

Caring gamekeepers warn public not to tamper with poisoned baits

poison2Gamekeepers in Scotland have asked the public not to hamper ‘legitimate moorland activities’ after a number of poisoned baits were disturbed next to a popular walking area.

The baits, which are approved by the Modern Poisoners’ Society to be deployed by trained gamekeepers to control predators such as golden eagles and red kites, were interfered with on a grouse moor in the Cairngorms National Park.

The local chapter of the Modern Poisoners’ Society said that those using the moors for access should not handle baits, especially as tampering by non-trained individuals can lead to accidents.

Grampian coordinator Ben D. O’Carb said: “Interference with poisoned baits is illegal and we would appeal to anyone who sees them whilst out walking not to move or handle them, even if they are curious as to why they are there.

These baits are set by trained professionals for a legitimate purpose. Thankfully, the majority of walkers enjoy the moors and are mindful they are places of work as well as recreation. In this particular instance, the disturbed baits were left out in the open, where they were originally placed, and could have posed a danger in an area where there are lots of dog walkers.

We want people to be safe so we would ask members of the public to leave the poisoned baits alone. If they want to find out more about them, they should engage with the gamekeepers who will be able to tell them how and why they are used. The gamekeepers will be easy to spot – they’ll be inside the 4×4 vehicle that’s been following you across the moor for the last hour, just to ensure your safety, obvs.”

Ps. God bless little angels in heaven“.

Actually, none of the above happened. We just made it up. Any resemblance to anyone living or dead is purely coincidental.

In other news, the Grampian Moorland Group is urging the public not to tamper with legally-set traps (see here). Those caring, thoughtful, considerate and public-spirited guardians of the countryside are worried that members of the public may be injured if traps are damaged.

Strangely, the article doesn’t mention the risks to the public (adults, children, pets) of touching or standing on an illegally-set spring trap that’s been staked out on open ground, or the potentially fatal consequences of touching an illegally poisoned bait.

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5 Responses to “Caring gamekeepers warn public not to tamper with poisoned baits”


  1. 1 michael gill
    August 30, 2016 at 3:10 pm

    Jesus … you had me there for just a moment. I thought the “Modern Poisoners’ Society” sounded plausible.

  2. 2 Roberta Mouse
    August 30, 2016 at 3:15 pm

    One wonders why the hell these neanderthals are legally allowed to place poison anywhere near where ‘there are lots of dog walkers’…or why they would take such a risk. They must really really want to cause death and suffering…at any price !

    [Roberta – the first part of this blog post is a spoof. They’re not ‘legally allowed to place poison’. Some of them do do it, illegally]

    • August 31, 2016 at 9:06 am

      BECAUSE they work for their master, the powerful land owners who are, in some cases in Scotland, allowed not to pay tax . The entire system is set up for these landowners and their friends to do what they want so that they can keep their wealth. The police are in the pockets too. problem is that not enough people fight back and we begin to drown if not very careful.

  3. 4 Secret Squirrel
    August 30, 2016 at 6:15 pm

    Trapping should be banned as well.

  4. 5 chris lock
    August 30, 2016 at 7:12 pm

    Poisoned baits should not be being used in the first place.


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