10
Jul
13

Red kite poisoned in Scotland

rk5And so it continues….

Today, the Scottish Government agency responsible for reporting on poisoned animals released the stats for the first quarter of this year (i.e. Jan-March 2013).

You will not be surprised to learn that, yet again, poisoning incidents have taken place and Police Scotland have chosen to suppress the information.

The data confirm that a poisoned red kite was discovered in March in ‘Central Scotland’ – no detailed location information given, naturally. Lab tests show it had been poisoned with Mevinphos. Four months for that information to slip out in a largely un-read government report. The level of secrecy involved in these cases is quite remarkable.

The data also show the poisoned baits that were uncovered at Leadhills in March – interestingly, they confirm the presence of Carbofuran but don’t comment on the number of baits found (which we know was a considerable number – see here) but they do say the baits were found inside gamebags. Four months on from the discovery and we’re still waiting for Police Scotland to make a public statement, not least to warn residents and visitors about the discovery of potentially fatal poison in a publicly-accessible location.

Also included in the data is the discovery of a Carbofuran-laced pigeon bait in Tayside in February 2013. Again, where was/is the public warning from Police Scotland?

It’s just bloody pathetic. Don’t tell us that the information has been suppressed for ‘operational’ reasons – that’s totally ridiculous and isn’t fooling anyone. The suppression of information benefits the landowners and gamekeepers – nobody else.

Compare this suppression of information with the work of Police Wildlife Crime Officers in Devon & Cornwall. Two of their WCOs – PC Josh Marshall and PC Paul Freestone – are so amazingly proactive that as well as having their own personal wildlife crime blogs (here and here), they’ve even set up a Wildlife Crime Group blog for their area (see here). On this blog, you’ll find information providing tips and advice about different types of wildlife crime, as well as information about specific alleged offences. For example, here they report on the recent suspected poisoning of two buzzards, and even provide photographs – all within a few days of the alleged crime being reported. Hats off to those two guys – committed, proactive, helpful and informative (although if you’re reading this Josh & Paul, you might want to revise your information about potential threats to harriers!!).

Back to Scotland….we would like to know why Police Scotland consistently fails to inform the public about alleged raptor persecution incidents, especially those involving the discovery of highly dangerous banned poisons in public areas. The public has a right to be kept informed. Sure, the Police may need a few weeks to conduct their initial investigations without letting on what they’re up to – as we’ve said over and over and over again, nobody in their right mind would want to interfere with that process and jeopardise a potential prosecution – but when it gets to three, four, five months after the incident and its bloody obvious that the investigation is dead in the water, then what possible reason is there for withholding the information, putting the lives of people and animals at risk? Here are some reasons: wanting to appease the landowners and gamekeepers on whose land the poison had been found, and wanting to appease the wider gameshooting industry who just hate to have the truth exposed about poisoning and the other methods of persecution that are being used against raptors on a regular basis.

If you’re also curious about the blanket suppression of information, you could always email the new Police Scotland Wildlife Crime Portfolio Leader, Detective Superintendent Cameron Cavin, and ask him to explain. One question to ask, as a friendly opener, nothing more, might be whether he has ever held membership in a game-shooting organisation, like, ooh, er, let’s say BASC for example, and if so, whether that membership is still held?…. Coincidentally, Det. Super. Cavin also just happens to have strong connections with central Scotland so he might also have information about the progress of the case concerning the poisoned red kite found there in March, or perhaps about the buzzard found there in March that had been caught in an illegal trap and had to be euthanised as a result of its injuries (see here). Bear in mind if you do email him, he’s obliged to reply within 20 working days so he can’t just ignore you, although obviously he can choose to fob you off without providing a satisfactory answer.

Email: Cameron.Cavin@centralscotland.pnn.police.uk


6 Responses to “Red kite poisoned in Scotland”


  1. 1 Chris Roberts
    July 10, 2013 at 7:21 pm

    One out of literally hundreds that should be flying over Scotland, but which have mysteriously disappeared. Oh well you can always drive south to the Chilterns in England where you are guaranteed a good presence of these magnificent birds.

  2. 2 Dougie
    July 10, 2013 at 7:24 pm

    Methinks crooks in uniform are at work.

  3. 3 Circus maximus
    July 10, 2013 at 10:39 pm

    All over central Scotland and Northern Ireland, fake exctasy tablets have been turning up and killing folk. This has been rapidly and widely publicised to try to reduce the risk to the public. Will this affect the trial?

  4. July 11, 2013 at 4:16 pm

    You know I’ve never lent much credence to conspiracy theorists and the like, but I’m beginning to be persuaded into something similar!! The consistency within the approaches adopted by different forces in Scotland suggests a common discipline being adopted. That’s scary as it suggests some influence exercised from afar, or within, on behalf of the common good, in this case the shooting fraternity. It stinks, it’s pure Establishment and it’s an influence we need to rid ourselves of and not just as far as raptor persecution either. I don’t mind if you banish this Comment to the ether, it’s what this deplorable situation makes me feel. Progress, what progress!

    • 5 Stewart Love
      July 12, 2013 at 6:19 pm

      It’s not a conspiracy Theory, it,s money and power. The Establishment not wising their “sport” to be stopped. It’s about shooting and Snobbery. ie “I was out shooting with Lord So and so on his Scottish estate we bagged loads of Grouse, Pheasants, Blackcock etc. Hit a few Buzzards as well but the Gamekeeper says he will take care of them not to worry”. It’s about the establishment playing their game and to hell with Wildlife/Conservation as long as they can keep on with their life style and to hell with everybody else. They will use any means in their power to keep shooting. It goes to the top of the tree in this country right to the very top. The whole system is being corrupted by them and has to stop.

    • 6 Dave Dick
      July 12, 2013 at 6:28 pm

      Read my book John – “Wildlife Crime” – and you can see the exact chronology of this situation…all started in the mid 90s with the formation of SGA…its only thanks to this blog that a wider public are questioning what is undoubtedly a stifling of public knowledge, never mind its effect on law enforcement and the justice system. There are still many deluded people who think that by being nice to wildlife criminals they will somehow toe the line…but there are also those within the system who agree with the wildlife killers that wildlife protection is a mistake and those in the shooting industry should be able to kill what they want.This isnt a “conspiracy theory”, its reality.


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